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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 5, 2010 2:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

That said, the best of all worlds is to go to a show and thengo home and hear it on the radio or however. Nowadays, many major bands sell sb cds of each show--sometimes on site.

You can thank Pearl Jam for that idea.

On another note, I would not say that someone who saw the band in 1985 had any less of a fine experience than I did in 1968. It wasn't for me--but who says it has to be or it's bad?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 5, 2010 3:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

Oh sure, I'll grant that 85 experience being important...but just like lecturing to 25 or 1000, once you reach a certain size, you "lose" the closeness...the experience I had with them was that usually they almost could have been behind a glass wall...the crowd was just too large, and they often, Jerry esp, seemed distraught over the fact that it was not more intimate...could be me reading into it, but I think all his interests in small venues with his smaller side project bands, speaks volumes as to his take being what I have laid out here today as well...

With the HS cover band I always drone on about it, we always had the same feeling: a small venue, with a dance focus, maybe just 200 folks, was much better than when we played a large venue with an elevated stage, etc., etc.

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Mar 5, 2010 3:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show


No Way

You mean that time Bob winked at me at Nassau Coliseum when I was 30 rows back on the floor dancing with some wild girl in a flowing skirt that he probably just had something stuck in his eye . . . I don't believe it!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 5, 2010 3:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

Uh, that was ME, not you, not the gal...Bob and I met backstage after that, and let me tell you, that was a LIVE experience that you just had to be there to understand!

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 6, 2010 5:38am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

I agree with Tell that the more intimate a show is, the greater the connection. When I first saw them in 1967, there were maybe 200 people in attendance. When I left, there were about 15,000 or more. I don't like stadium/arena shows because I feel like I'm at a ballgame--a huge crowd and a tiny stage--but ballgames are meant to be that way. Music isn't.
After I got off the bus, I got into the N.Y.C. loft jazz movement. Seeing great musicians in intimate settings--lofts, small clubs--reminded meof the good old days.

BUT--that doesn't mean one can't go and have fun, enjoying the parking lot scene, the twirlers, friends--just having a good time.

I just like to be able to see the faces of the musicans I'm listening to.

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Poster: mickmac Date: Mar 5, 2010 3:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

Attending is important but not essential. It depends entirely on the person. Not everyone at the show had the time of their life or walked away with a new found love of the music. I never saw Wagner live but still like his stuff alot.

This post was modified by mickmac on 2010-03-05 23:35:58

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 5, 2010 5:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Wrapping it all up...

I defn like how mMac and Mando put it above, as did some others...in the end, my point was that I may be the exception, and it may even "prove the rule" (that you really did have to be there), but of course, I don't think so.

In the end, the notion that we are all different, and all experienced it in somewhat diff ways, is primarily what I was going on about above. And, if you accept that, then it follows the whole "you had to be there" thesis cannot be absolutely true.

For some, it may have been necessary, for others, an important component; but for some, like me, and those that never saw them, it is not a critical, make it or break it issue.

So, my over the top, tongue in cheek rants above were really about debunking the myth that our little club req'd acceptance that it was all about being there...I like Mando's pie analogy: your 12 slices are fine, and my 8 are fine too, as we each have a whole pie; the means by which they sum to complete us, each as individuals, is just that--different, but with no notion of a lack or missing vital element if the "being there" slice is missing, or damaged due to user error (what I suppose some of you think I did with my time with the boys between 74-82).

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Mar 5, 2010 8:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Wrapping it all up...like a carne asada burrito

Oh, my God. Enough with pies already. You food-centric people seem unable to create an analogy without at least one part of it being edible.

On the other hand, seeing the Dead WAS like a box of chocolates. Really tasty at first, but the room eventually got too hot and it all melted into a gooey, overweight, sweaty, strung out, unwashed blob.

But, like most other too-stoned-to-see freaks, we kept eating anyway.

This post was modified by SomeDarkHollow on 2010-03-06 04:01:40

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 6, 2010 12:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Wrapping it all up...like a carne asada burrito

"too hot and all melted into a gooey, overweight, sweaty, strung out, unwashed blob"

Good thing Miss D didn't read this; for a minute I thought you were talking about me...

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Poster: vapors Date: Mar 5, 2010 4:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

Oh boy - no matter how large the venue or crowd (or what may have made Jerry distraught on a given evening) – I heard the music. I confess, I was a dancer, and took whatever space I could to do my thing. The band was a great one, and Jerry’s guitar never failed to reach my ears. And I always felt close to Jerry, now matter what the obstacles were – and we learned quickly how to avoid or move on from the obstacles. Jerry was why I was there, and why I am here on this forum even today.

Today it is easy to listen to the music in good fidelity, possibly in the environment of one’s choosing. We are fortunate indeed. I enjoy posting about my touring adventures because it is something true for me, and less complicated for me than a musical analysis – but I intend to work on that. And summer tour 85 was a mighty fine experience to me !

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Mar 5, 2010 2:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

I'm aware that having gone to shows I have a different relationship with the music of the band than someone who has not attended,but I think that has more to do with the whole scene that went along with the GD.I really enjoy the music of Duke Ellington and have spent a lifetime listening to a wide array of his music,and if someone told me I don't get it like they do because they saw Duke ,I would find insulting and laughable.Music is to be listened to and does not require anything other than listening to be enjoyed and understood.Lia being the perfect example.

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Mar 5, 2010 7:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The importance of attending a show

"On another note, I would not say that someone who saw the band in 1985 had any less of a fine experience than I did in 1968. It wasn't for me--but who says it has to be or it's bad? "


I'm pretty sure it was Cliff that said that!! ;)


On a more serious note... Lots of good posts on the subject. GoP, Tell, Jglynn, Mando Et al....all have some very interesting view points, and make those points very well I think.

what I come away from this discussion with is...

It seems to me that the relationship between the band / music and the individual is different for everyone. Kinda like a fingerprint in a way. No 2 people view exactly the same. It is between me and the music. No one else's is exactly like mine. Others may have some similar qualities to mine, but none are exactly like mine. A "that path is for your steps alone" type of thing.
It's the same path, It's just slightly (or greatly) different for each of us.

Am I making sense?? Or should I just shut up and go to bed??